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Is Post Partum Depression Real?

Giving birth is one of the most pleasing and exciting experiences of life. Nearly every parent has felt the baby blues: Hormones are fluctuating. You’re sleep disturbed. A new family member means new tasks. Nevertheless, a lot of mothers also experience postpartum depression (PPD). Even if the most common problem of childbirth, PPD often goes unnoticed and untreated, putting the mother and child at risk.

WHAT IS POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION?

It’s the identical as what we call major sadness, except it’s identified up to a year after giving birth. For example, 1 out of 10 females will experience PPD. In this article we will disclose common myths about postpartum depression.

SADNESS MYTH: I’M HAVING A BOY SO I’M AT GREATER RISK.

FACT: WHO’S REALLY MOST AT RISK FOR PPD?

  • First-time mothers
  • Mothers younger than 25 years old
  • Mothers of twins, particularly moms older than 40

These conclusions come from a published study that surveyed more than 1.1 million new mothers. These females live all over the globe and use an app to track their fertility and menstrual cycles. The scope of this study and universal sample makes the findings highly significant and definitive, says a nationally recognized expert on PPD. Scientists’ research found no big difference in rates of postpartum depression among mothers of boys or girls.

SADNESS MYTH: THERE’S NO WAY TO TEST FOR PPD.

FACT: THERE’S A TEST. BUT IT’S NOT OFTEN GIVEN.

All through obstetric care and child visits, your doctor should give you a list of questions to answer. If you score a 13 or more, you’re very likely to develop major depression. Regrettably, a lot of doctors don’t screen their patients for depression during and after pregnancy. Many females with PPD are not diagnosed or treated, experts say. 

Furthermore, they screen 99% of pregnant women for gestational diabetes, and its occurrence is only in the single digits. There’s been a real reluctance to screen for major despair. Besides, it is pregnancy’s most common problem.

DEPRESSION MYTH: I CAN’T TAKE DEPRESSION PILLS IF I’M PREGNANT.

FACT: IT’S IMPORTANT TO WEIGH ANTIDEPRESSANTS’ RISKS & BENEFITS.

Various females are told by their doctors to go off their antidepressants during pregnancy. This is one of the myths. It’s significant for physicians and patients to contemplate the risks of pills versus the risks of untreated depression, experts say. If untreated it can threaten a mother’s life, and it can disturb the child’s IQ and language development.

DEPRESSION MYTH: I’M FADING AS A MOTHER IF I’M DEPRESSED.

FACT: PPD IS A TREATABLE CONDITION & NO ONE’S FAULT.

Those who develop PPD need to know they:

  • Are not to blame
  • Want to get treatment 

This sorrow myth can make a new mother less likely to admit she has PPD. Then a partner may be uncertain to point out there’s a problem. Most moms may see postpartum depression as a shortcoming in their mothering. You’re supposed to be really happy. Nevertheless, you’re not. We want to make new mothers feel okay with what they’re feeling and to ask for help,” says expert.

With their study, scientists hope to help end the shame that keeps many people from seeking treatment for a mental health disorder. 

2022-07-27T14:04:05+05:30